World War II

Latest Posts in World War II

Enlarging Our Discourse

The column I wrote for the June 2018 issue of ASA News & Notes could easily be the column I write this month: a year ago, it covered school shootings, mass shootings, the Trump administration’s separation of children from their refuge parents, and insult with bluster as a form of diplomacy. A year later, we see not much has changed, and each of these topics makes news regularly.


What Would Winston Churchill Say to Donald Trump?

What Would Winston Churchill Say to Donald Trump? We know, because he actually said it -- though not, of course, to Trump.  It bears repeating.

A comparison between Churchill and Trump is mortifying.  How could we have elected such an odiferous cesspool of a man? If Churchill’s actions speak louder than his words, his soaring words resonate like the sound of Big Ben. 

 


Who will cry for me when I’m gone?

America has a long history of scattering ashes and burying bodies in hallowed soil everywhere, and even beyond our own land. The Normandy American Cemetery is where thousands of white Christian crosses, Jewish stars of david, and Islamic five-pointed stars mark the graves of our soldiers who died on French soil during World War II.Many other cemeteries scattered around our own nation are full of weather beaten headstones, stained by tall grass and choked with weeds. The grave markers are like pearls that have long ago lost their luster and, yet, are as pure as the tears shed by those who once loved these fallen soldiers.

 


The Last Christmas Trees

 

In 1965 as a new reporter for the Newark Evening News, I was on Bloomfield Avenue frantically searching for a Christmas story. I approached the manager of the township charity Christmas tree lot, asking him if he had any leads.

“Funny you ask,” he said, “just sold my usual last 10 trees to two twin brothers, something we do every year. There’s a story if they’ll tell you.”

He knew no more about them except...


Nadezhda Popova: Rising To Her Times

Nadezhda Popova was a true heroine of the Soviet Union – a real-life Luke Skywalker who flew biplanes with canvas wings over enemy territory to drop bombs on the advancing German Army.

She was from Donetsk – that embattled part of eastern Ukraine that is mostly Russian-speaking today and was firmly a part of Stalin’s empire. In Russian, her name was “Nadia.” And, by all accounts, she was all woman.

The women of the...