Law

Ambition and Wishful Thinking

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AMBITION AND WISHFUL THINKING: CONJOINED TWINS IN CIVIL LITIGATION

For many years I’ve mediated thousands of widely varied civil lawsuits.  No matter how diverse the subject matter, wrongful death, real estate, employment or contract, many cases have been fueled by an ambition that is often hard to distinguish from wishful thinking.  Although ambition is usually displayed by the amount of damages sought by plaintiffs and their attorneys, it also regularly appears in the attitude of defendants and their lawyers and insurance claims personnel for different reasons.

Plaintiffs ambitiously chase “justice” having never experienced the difficulty of winning a civil lawsuit.  The most ambitious litigants in this regard are usually the least...

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