How many times can your heart get broken?

Just in time for Valentine’s Day…How many times can your heart get broken? This question is asked by fifteen-year-old Cookie Colangelo in The Heart of Yonkers.


Jam Club Makes a Special Kind of Music

When Elisa Lewis began the Maple Valley Youth Symphony Orchestra, it was to give young musicians a chance to perform repertoire written for orchestras and smaller ensembles. Although her college degree was in recreational therapy, she had thoroughly enjoyed playing a musical instrument throughout her school-age years, and she wanted to provide the next generation of students with the same opportunity. 


Why Making the COVID Vaccine was a Longshot

An interview with David Heath, author of Longshot, reveals that government, business and many researchers doubted the science that made the COVID vaccine possible. 


"Fleeing the Fates of the Little Rascals” is a charming memoir

Laura June Kenney’s “Fleeing the Fates of the Little Rascals” is a charming memoir, in earnest, that omits the day-to-day, nitty gritty reality of being a child actor. 


The Music Lives On

Neither of my parents was musically inclined. My mother could not sing, but rather spoke the lyrics to a few songs; while my father, who took violin lessons as a young child, would often croon along with a tune coming from the wooden box in the corner of the living room.   

 


NOTES FROM THE WORKING-CLASS: Wipe Out

My neighborhood in the north end, called Down the End by the locals, trilled and thrummed with the unerring twang of guitars. Every boy on the block, talented or not, musically inclined or musically challenged, had mastered the three simple chords to play Wipe Out on the guitar with unerring frequency, regardless of the season or the time of day. From garages and basements, yards, parks and parking lots, impromptu jam sessions broke out into the ubiquitous street sound of drums humping under the sturm and drang of electric guitars. 


Notes from the Working-Class: Reverence

Three white, working-class men, heads bowed, wistful eyes, lips pursed in silent prayer, are visibly overcome with emotion. They are baseball umpires, pressing their caps to their hearts in a show of reverence for two Little League teams. 


Yarn, chain link and community connection

When you hear about public art, it’s usually the monumental kind that attracts attention, like Mount Rushmore or the Statue of Liberty. The backdrops for these works might be bustling cities or magnificent landscapes, but public art, historically, has not found its way into the suburbs. It’s rarely a feature in shopping plazas or residential neighborhoods.