Annie Searle

Annie Searle | The Risk Detective

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Annie Searle is a full time faculty lecturer at the University of Washington’s School of Information, where she teaches graduate courses on risk management, on the foundations of information management, as well as a course on ethics, policy and law with respect to information management. She is a lifetime member of The Institute of American Entrepreneurs, and a 2011 inductee into The Hall of Fame for Women in Homeland Security and Emergency Management. Since 2007, she has been an invited participant at New York University’s Global Roundtable on Public-Private Preparedness; and a member of RPCFIRST, the Regional Partnership Council, an umbrella organization formed in 2005 to foster collaboration on on homeland security and emergency management issues with the public sector...

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Latest Posts in Annie Searle

On Amazon – Annie Searle’s Risk Reconsidered

The field of operational risk management is still relatively new.  Last year, I thought about creating a risk textbook and shopping it to publishers like Pearson or Wiley because I have not been able to find a single risk textbook for classroom use either at the introductory or advanced level. When I examined that route more thoroughly, I realized that it would not work for me or my readers mainly because of the time involved to publish a book and the price the publisher would set for such a volume. Then there is the more elementary issue that most of my writing has immediacy, examining current events within the broader framework of risk, governance, policy, and law. 


Great Teacher: Mr. Larson

I grew up in a very small town -- population 1100 – and benefitted in every way from the experience.  I learned to read when I was four years old, thanks to a friend who was older and liked to “play school” at least once a day.  My first job was working in the small public library, re-shelving books once a week as the librarian’s helper once I started primary school.  I enjoyed school through those years, but it was in high school that I studied with the most influential teacher I ever had, Mr. Larson.


Our Darkest Hour is Still Ahead

It is not just that the size of the government has been reduced intentionally. It is not just that many cabinet level appointees are unqualified for public service. It is not only that our government policies have been revised or in some cases re-interpreted or eliminated. Similarities to conditions in Germany that led to the rise of Hitler are hard to miss – the nationalistic, boastful tone; the harsh and unrelenting attacks on a free press as “fake news;” the key roles that members of the military play in the current administration; the endless insults and sparring with other countries; the deaf ear turned to hate speech; and the pitiful, narcissistic, and whiny tweets from the nation’s highest elected official.

 

 

 

 


Channeling Nelson Mandela

How far can our great institutions, whether courts of law, public libraries or even universities go to preserve the values and freedoms most of us have enjoyed? If the three branches of government were designed to provide a system of checks and balances on power, then where are we on the spectrum right now? How much worse will it get before course corrections begin? 


Yes, Virginia, We Still Have Three Branches of Government

The Government has taken the position that the President’s decisions about immigration policy, particularly when motivated by national security concerns, are unreviewable, even if those actions potentially contravene constitutional rights and protections. The Government indeed asserts that it violates separation of powers for the judiciary to entertain a constitutional challenge to executive actions such as this one.