News

Ethnic Thanksgiving: Cultural Appropriation?

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On its surface it appears to be a simple decision: it can be dull serving the same stuffed Turkey with cranberries and potatoes every Thanksgiving. A modern home cook might be itching to surprise guests with some spices or out-of-the-box meats, sweets and starches. Why not make the turkey in curry paste or serve it with peanut sauce? While it's fun to try new ideas fro other cultures, when does borrowing ideas from ethnic cuisine cross the line and become cultural misappropiation? 

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