Articles on PR for People

Food Innovation Network offers a new take on a time-honored tradition

We are just two years shy of the fourth centennial of one of America’s most cherished American traditions – Thanksgiving. That original harvest feast was celebrated in 1621 by three-score Pilgrims and a Native American contingent twice that size. The Wampanoag had welcomed the desperate English immigrants to their shores, shared food with them, and taught them American agricultural methods.


Building the Whale Trail

Take a journey along the whale trail to encounter the majesty of orca whales. Barbara Lloyd McMichael has written an outstanding feature article about Donna Sandstrom, who was appointed by Washington Governor Jay Inslee to serve on the Southern Resident Orca Task Force. In this instance, “Southern Residents” refers to an extended orca clan, comprising several pods, that sometimes travel together in the Pacific Northwest.  Donna Sandstrom is also the executive director of The Whale Trail, a nonprofit that encourages whale-watching from shoreline sites. 


The Marine Mammal Library – A Deep Dive into Research

This month, if your curiosity about orcas is piqued, and you’d like to do a “deep dive” into orca lore, the Seattle-based National Marine Mammals Laboratory/Western Region has an excellent library for marine mammals and offers extensive research materials focusing on orcas. Just one hitch, the library doesn’t offer drop-in dives. You must book an appointment in advance to examine their materials. 


The ultimate startup? Preschool education!

At the Second Nordic Innovation Summit, held recently at the National Nordic Museum in Seattle, there was a convergence of startups from blue tech (maritime), green/clean tech, financial innovation and smart cities. But there was one presenter that made the most convincing argument of all for its standing as a startup. Helsinki International Schools (HEI Schools) is a new enterprise that is licensing its Finnish early education model to schools around the globe.


The Pencil Test finesses the fit

 When Holly Powell opened her first bra shop in Portland, Oregon in 2011, she wanted a name that was pronounceable and memorable.  “Lots of women’s lingerie stores have French names that people can’t pronounce. I wanted something that said very clearly to the world, ‘we do big boobs.’”


An antidote to college admissions scandals

   In light of the recent FBI sting dubbed Operation Varsity Blues, and with so much of the media’s bandwidth currently being dedicated to certain high-profile universities and their (wink-wink) acceptance policy concerning students with wealthy and over-zealous parents, this seems like a good time to look beyond the demoralizing college admissions racket that is fueled by privilege and dollars and to learn about legitimate post secondary alternatives for folks who don’t have a big bankroll. 


Criminal justice reform – “getting at” a better model

“I run a repair shop, not a junkyard.” It’s a motto Dave Larson spouts – frequently. But he is no auto mechanic. Larson is a Municipal Court Judge in Federal Way, Washington, a community of just under 100,000 people, located between Seattle and Tacoma. This city has experienced most of its growth as an affordable bedroom community to those larger cities to the north and south. Now it’s struggling to establish an identity of its own, while grappling with all of the attendant crises of the 21st century – including the opioid epidemic, homelessness, and crime.


From privilege to the poor house – one woman’s story

In a tale of riches-to-rags, Barbara Lloyd McMichael gives us a snapshot of the photographer Alice Austen, who once lived on Staten Island. Today her former home, The Alice Austen House, is a national historic landmark, and a significant site for LGBTQ history.


When Civics Leaps Off The Page

In Washington State, civics education leaps off the page...


Luthier strikes the right chord

Although it is tucked into an industrial park that’s situated directly under the flight path into SeaTac International Airport, d’Aigle Autoharps almost seems like a throwback to a pre-jet-setting era. Out in the parking lot, jets with their landing gear already down scream overhead every minute or so, but step inside the door of this cozy folk instrument store and you’ll find not just autoharps, but a generous array of guitars, banjos, mandolins, sitars, Celtic harps and dulcimers, hearkening back to simpler times and pleasures.