Articles on PR for People

The ultimate startup? Preschool education!

At the Second Nordic Innovation Summit, held recently at the National Nordic Museum in Seattle, there was a convergence of startups from blue tech (maritime), green/clean tech, financial innovation and smart cities. But there was one presenter that made the most convincing argument of all for its standing as a startup. Helsinki International Schools (HEI Schools) is a new enterprise that is licensing its Finnish early education model to schools around the globe.


The Pencil Test finesses the fit

 When Holly Powell opened her first bra shop in Portland, Oregon in 2011, she wanted a name that was pronounceable and memorable.  “Lots of women’s lingerie stores have French names that people can’t pronounce. I wanted something that said very clearly to the world, ‘we do big boobs.’”


An antidote to college admissions scandals

   In light of the recent FBI sting dubbed Operation Varsity Blues, and with so much of the media’s bandwidth currently being dedicated to certain high-profile universities and their (wink-wink) acceptance policy concerning students with wealthy and over-zealous parents, this seems like a good time to look beyond the demoralizing college admissions racket that is fueled by privilege and dollars and to learn about legitimate post secondary alternatives for folks who don’t have a big bankroll. 


Criminal justice reform – “getting at” a better model

“I run a repair shop, not a junkyard.” It’s a motto Dave Larson spouts – frequently. But he is no auto mechanic. Larson is a Municipal Court Judge in Federal Way, Washington, a community of just under 100,000 people, located between Seattle and Tacoma. This city has experienced most of its growth as an affordable bedroom community to those larger cities to the north and south. Now it’s struggling to establish an identity of its own, while grappling with all of the attendant crises of the 21st century – including the opioid epidemic, homelessness, and crime.


From privilege to the poor house – one woman’s story

In a tale of riches-to-rags, Barbara Lloyd McMichael gives us a snapshot of the photographer Alice Austen, who once lived on Staten Island. Today her former home, The Alice Austen House, is a national historic landmark, and a significant site for LGBTQ history.


When Civics Leaps Off The Page

In Washington State, civics education leaps off the page...


Luthier strikes the right chord

Although it is tucked into an industrial park that’s situated directly under the flight path into SeaTac International Airport, d’Aigle Autoharps almost seems like a throwback to a pre-jet-setting era. Out in the parking lot, jets with their landing gear already down scream overhead every minute or so, but step inside the door of this cozy folk instrument store and you’ll find not just autoharps, but a generous array of guitars, banjos, mandolins, sitars, Celtic harps and dulcimers, hearkening back to simpler times and pleasures.


Resolutions require mental resilience

   Travis Daigle has compassion for everyone out there who – yet again – has made a list of resolutions to tackle in the New Year. But he warns that goals like losing weight or curbing spending habits are always peripheral to the bigger challenge, which is acquiring the mental toughness to do hard things. 


Entrepreneur finds his sweet spot

Jordan Allen is dressed conservatively: dark suit, white dress shirt open at the neck, a heavy watch on his wrist. When he’s done with his set-up, it’s still early, so he works the room, going around the table, introducing himself, shaking hands with everyone. In answer to a question, he says that he’s been in business for six years. Which might not seem that remarkable, until you consider that Jordan is in the eighth grade. But after he’s been formally introduced by his host, and launches into his talk, there’s no doubt that this young man has developed significant business vocabulary and acumen over half a dozen years of growing his business.


A Garden’s Most Successful Yield is Community Connection

 A neighborhood called “Pacific Ridge” might conjure up visions of estate homes with saltwater views, but nothing could be further from the truth in Des Moines, Washington. This small town, situated midway between Seattle and Tacoma and founded by Midwestern pioneers, was for decades home to small businesses and a beachfront Bible camp. But it began to see substantial change in the 1960s, when Interstate 5 punched through the area and suburban sprawl followed, with the paving-over of the waterfront to make room for a marina, the selling-off of small farms, and the building of high-density housing in their place.