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December 10, 2013
First Washington State High School Ethics BowlContact: Jana Mohr Lone, Director, +1-206-221-6297, mohrlone@uw.edu University of Washington Center ... More

Bio Data

Jana Mohr Lone is the director and founder of the University of Washington's Center for Philosophy for Children. The Center brings philosophers and students trained in philosophy into K-12 public school classrooms to facilitate philosophy classes. Jana is the author of The Philosophical Child, which explores ways that parents and other adults can stimulate philosophical conversations about children's questions, and she co-edited the book Philosophy and Education: Introducing Philosophy to Young People, which examines various issues involved in teaching philosophy to young people. Since 1995 she has taught philosophy in classrooms from preschool to college, as well as taught college students, K-12 teachers, parents and others about ways to bring philosophy into the lives of young people. A frequent writer and speaker about pre-college philosophy, Jana is the chair of the American Philosophical Association Committee on Pre-College Instruction in Philosophy and the founding editor-in-chief of the journal Questions: Philosophy for Young People.
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Experience

Title:  Philosophy Professor specializing in Philosophy for Children
Occupation:  Jana Mohr Lone is the director and founder of the University of Washington Center for Philosophy for Children
Industry:  Non-Profit Organization
Sub-Industry:  Education
Experience Area:  Jana Mohr Lone is the director and founder of the University of Washington Center for Philosophy for Children. The Center brings philosophers and students trained in philosophy into K-12 public school classrooms to facilitate philosophy classes.

Complete Experience

Latest Blogs »

    Wednesday, May 8, 2013

    Just Pretend

    Benny and Penny in Just Pretend, by Geoffrey Hayes, is an early-reader graphic novel about two siblings and the efforts of the younger child, Penny, to join her brother in “playing pretend.” Constructing pretend worlds is part of many children’s childhoods – I remember when my children wouldn’t answer me unless I addressed them as “Darth Vader” or whomever they were pretending to be. And, of course, younger siblings efforts to get their older brothers and sisters to include and accept them is also part of many children’s experiences.

    The story raises questions about why we create pretend worlds, the lines between pretending and getting lost in fantasies, the differences between playing alone and playing with others, how siblings understand one another, and how our relationships with other people change us.