BOOK REVIEW by Patricia Vaccarino: Student Power, Democracy and Revolution in the Sixties

Nick Licata’s latest book is a timely, relevant, and compelling narrative that draws us into the glory days of student activism during the 1960s.These are the halcyon days of citizen empowerment when groups like the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) flourished, imbuing many thousands of young people with a collective conscience to make a better world. At the very least, their attempt to make a better world became a laudable, good faith effort. 


Libraries We Love – Hindi’s Libraries—Books from Hindi’s heart

Each month, we profile a library: Large, small, urban, rural, post-modern, quaint or neo-classic. This month Patricia Vaccarino writes about a small school project that quickly grew into a national literacy initiative.


Is Facebook Ready?

To date, Congress has been unable to determine a legislative path for dealing with Facebook and similar companies.


Notes from the road: The Holocaust of Trees

Patricia Vaccarino writes about the changing climate in the Pacific Northwest and its impact on the great trees that gave the Evergreen State its name and reputation.


Diné College Case Study: How federal funding increases equity, connectivity, opportunity

Barbara Lloyd McMichael explores how federal funding can increase equity, connectivity and opportunity. Established by the Navajo Nation in 1968, Diné College is the first tribally controlled and accredited collegiate institution in the country.


Moving Words

Moving Words is a 5-week course that brings together an intimate group of writers for guidance and support. 


Building Back Better: the U.S. Department of Education

Barbara Lloyd McMichael’s monthly column examines the impact of the Biden Administration’s Building Back Better initiative. This month she focuses on the U.S. Department of Education.


The “Bloody English” is a well-deserved moniker

Mantel conjures the world under the reign of Henry VIII and delivers Thomas Cromwell, in all of his complexity, to us as a sort of gift that keeps giving. If we can understand Cromwell, then maybe we can learn to understand ourselves.